Cardboard Canoe Challenge : 2019

Cardboard Canoe Challenge : 2019

Another year another set of crazy cardboard creations. 

8 boats went out and amazingly all stayed afloat for a while ……

Annual Prize Giving 2019

Annual Prize Giving 2019

The annual celebration of club paddlers – fast, slow, wet, dry and more took place at the old Swan at Walton on 27th April. 

The list of prizes was as follows.

The list of prizes was as follows.Best newcomer : Jana – for organising lots of weekend paddles from the club

Best newcomer : Jana – for organising lots of weekend paddles from the club
Best Xmas lights – Robert & Lourette – for the K2 reindeer sleigh
Outstanding contribution – most challenging club job – Anne-Lise – for being rack manager and dealing with all the difficult stuff
Outstanding contribution – Dan Bownds – for organising many trips, canoe sessions and other skills training
Rupert magic carpenter – for restoring the club bench.
Kathy- for doing such a great job with the website.
Wildlife Warden of the Year: Derek, for going into the sea at the back of a Menorcan cave to rescue a sea bird
Travel Agent of the Year: Morten, for booking us into a sumptuous Danish mansion for our paddling weekend.
Amanda Gosport, “Best litter picker”, she managed to find a toilet in the river, and picked it up, yuk!
Jenny, “jelly babies Queen”. She always has a stash of jelly babies on hand on every trip.
Maxine Nelson, “club rock’. from a beginner to a level 1 coach and committee member – does so much for the club
Frank, materials science award for best cardboard boat 2018

 

Try a Tippier Boat Evening

Try a Tippier Boat Evening

A fun evening was had by all with 30 paddlers on or in the water, with more than half trying a boat less stable than the one they usually paddle!

Peter led the session aided by Maxine giving advice, encouragement and rescue help where needed.  There was some impressive paddling (and some impressive swimming). 

Tamra also organised a fab BBQ with head chef Adam. A lovely sociable end to the evening.

Cardboard Boat Race – The rules!

Cardboard Boat Race - The rules!

This year it will be held on Saturday 25th May – getting together at the clubhouse by 10.30am and aiming to launch by 11.00am.
 
All are welcome to join in. Just build some kind of cardboard boat and see how long you can keep it afloat. Your craft can be as sophisticated or as unsophisticated as you like (Dan is a particularly noted expert in converting cardboard boxes into well… wetter cardboard boxes)! The only real objective is to have some fun.
 
There will be the usual trophies and certificates to the most successful entries (don’t get too excited – Dan makes those out of cardboard as well). 
 
BYO barbeque afterwards once we’ve all dried off.
 
Start collecting cardboard!
For full instruction see here.
Plus Technical stuff on making boats float here!
 
Happy constructing!

Congratulations Mike and Peter

Congratulations Mike & Peter

Congratulations to Mike Channon and Peter Loy who last weekend competed in the annual Frank Luzmore Memorial Marathon race from Elmbridge Canoe Club to Richmond Canoe Club. They paddled mixed doubles for Richmond Canoe Club in the 20km, 3 portage, race with Peter in the second fastest veteran team at 1:46:09 and Mike ‘s team coming in less than 3 minutes later at 1:48:54. A pace for the rest of us to aspire to when doing the loop….



 

Winter and Night Paddling

British Summer Time ends on 28 October and already the sun is setting just after 7pm. Wednesday evening club paddles are finishing at dusk will soon cease to begin again next spring.

But don’t despair – Hamptoneers still go out paddling after dark in informal groups and there are some member-led night paddles.

Paddling after dark can be a great experience on a calm night with the reflections of boat and street lights it can be very tranquil. But there are a few precautions needed:

1. Put a white light fore and aft on your boat so that other boats can see you, (put them in a small clear bag if not waterproof). A head torch is also very useful as the light is higher above the water and if you fall in you’re easier to spot.

2. Wear reflective clothing and/or light coloured clothing, reflective strips on your paddle are also good to catch attention.

3. Keep an extra sharp lookout for rowing boats which can be travelling very fast and their light is very low down so not always easy to see.

4. Ideally, go out with a partner so you can keep an eye on each other in case either gets into difficulty.

5. Wear a PFD

In the colder weather
1. If you’re unsure of your abilities paddle with a more experienced member.
2. Wear layers of quick drying clothes, a waterproof top and a warm hat.
3. Carry a change of clothes with you in a dry bag.
4. Consider buying rubber paddling boots and gloves (members have a 15% discount at Whitewater Canoes in Shepperton Marina).
5. Wear a PDF and before setting off check the weather forecast and the river conditions.

Hamptoneers Train with the ‘Blue Light’ Services

HAMPTONEERS TRAIN WITH THE ‘BLUE  LIGHT’ RESCUE SERVICES 

(and so make paddling a bit safer for all local paddlers)

Dan shows how to rescue a canoe

One Monday evening in June, eight excellent Hamptoneers paddled into Shepperton Marina, right round to the back where White Water The Canoe Centre has its base.  There they met two lifeboats from Surrey Fire & Rescue, who are based in Walton.

Two days later, the same excellent paddlers drove into a modern property development just downstream of Teddington Lock, where Teddington RNLI station is based.

On both evenings, the agenda was the same:  to provide the rescuers with experience and hints on how to rescue paddlers, kayaks and canoes; and to provide the paddlers with a greater understanding of how rescuers are likely to approach rescuing a paddler or their boat.  Our written plan is HERE   We’d done much the same with the RNLI back in November.

Surrey Fire & Rescue came with two different boats and a total of seven crew.  The RNLI had two identical boats, 13 crew and 3 helms, with a wide range of experience.  And along with the RNLI came two volunteers from the Duke of Edinburgh’s award scheme, trying to capture in writing what was being taught, so that the RNLI would have a permanent record of the training.

To start each evening, after introductions, Derek explained the features of our boats.  We had deliberately brought a wide range of club boats:  a canoe, a Cirrus K1, the Rorqual K2, a Scorpio sea kayak and the Ethos whitewater kayak.  He showed them the flotation, deck lines, toggles – handily available on some boats and not others.  And the first lesson in How To Empty a K1 was delivered.

Peter Loy then convincingly proved we’re not totally helpless:  he demonstrated rolling a sea kayak; a deep water rescue, sea kayak to sea kayak; and being rescued using the ‘Hand of God’ rescue.

On to the water:  Maxine, Dan, Andy and Jenny kept one boatload of rescuers busy with boats to empty.  And they were busy themselves, bringing out each boat, flooding it, providing hints on how to approach the problem, then taking the boat, wet but empty, back to the bank.

Meanwhile the other boatload of rescuers was occupied with recuing paddlers, who were feigning being ill or injured while sat in their boats.  Peter in a white water boat turned out to be easy to rescue:  they just grabbed the front handle and pulled him straight on to the lifeboat!  Paul was rescued from a sea kayak with a keyhole cockpit, as well as intentionally falling into the water and needing to be pulled out.

Last of all, the evening’s tough guy:  Michele, sitting in her sea kayak with its tiny ‘ocean’ cockpit, capsized and waited patiently upside down while the rescuers brought her back to the surface so she could resume breathing.  Then they extricated her onto the lifeboat.

The rescuers were very pleased with the evenings.  Surrey Fire & Rescue said “The watch were all very complimentary about the event itself and the members of the club. Please thank them all on our behalf for giving up their time and expertise so readily.”

RNLI said “Thanks so much yet again to you and your marvellous club-mates for a brilliant session last night.  Everyone enjoyed it and found it very informative and useful, especially our newer crew, many of whom were there.”  The RNLI issued a press release

Meanwhile I am writing an article for The Paddler ezine, hoping that other canoe clubs might read it and develop a habit of training with their local rescue services.  That would help make paddling a little bit safer.  And I am being asked “When shall we do it again?”

Rescue services Joint Training Plans – session plan (word document)

Andrew Wallace – June 2018

Hamptoneers taking part : Derek Heath, Michele Springall, Peter Loy, Paul Scott, Maxine Nelson, Dan Bownds, Jenny John Chuan and Andy Garbett

 

Christmas Lights Paddle

A large group of Hamptoneers decorated their canoes and kayaks to form a psychedlic travelling light-show for the traditional paddle down to Ye Olde Swan at Thames Ditton last Wednesday evening.

Paul Scott turned his canoe into a floating Xmas tree and was awarded the prestigious

‘Best Decorated Xmas Boat 2017’ 

RNLI training sessions with HCC

November 2017

Hampton CC has just had two excellent training sessions with Teddington RNLI.  In the past they’ve dealt with incidents with kayaks, so they were very receptive when approached with the idea of joint training.

 RNLI comes to Hampton

First of all, the RNLI came to Hampton, for a joint session with, and at, Hampton Sailing Club.  The RNLI told us that their patch includes tidal and non-tidal Thames from Richmond past Teddington to Molesey.  The crew are all volunteers living near the lock, 23 good souls in all, and they have two D Class lifeboats there.  They showed us how they react to a shout: they’re afloat within three minutes, which I think is amazing; and they get through Teddingon lock in one minute and forty seconds, which is astounding.  They shared with us sound wisdom about cold water, life jackets, etc.  23 Hamptoneers attended, together with 16 sailors and 7 from the RNLI.  Jenny organised a wonderful lunch for us all afterwards.

 

HCC goes to Teddington

 

The following weekend, which was last weekend, we went to their base on the ground floor of a modern block of flats near The Wharf restaurant just downstream of Teddington Lock.  In all we were nine, coaches or experienced paddlers.  We had given some thought to what we could do with the RNLI that would be worthwhile for them, so we planned the afternoon in three parts:

  • land-based briefing from Derek Heath and Mark Lewis:  they explained the features of our various boats, and how those differences impact rescues (we showed them a canoe, a WW boat, an open cockpit K1 and a sea kayak).  Then Derek and I demonstrated some of our rescue techniques, so they wouldn’t think we were completely clueless !
  • on the water, the RNLI rescued the various boats we’d brought. Peter Loy, Richard Fisher and Andy Garbett were on hand to flood the boats, and to explain and encourage effective rescues.  The open cockpit Cirrus was the most difficult to rescue, as you’d expect.
  • on the water, the RNLI rescued Mike Channon from his WW boat, Michele Springall from her sea kayak or Morten Lunde from his Nordkapp sea kayak with a tiny ocean cockpit (that wasn’t easy).  And they tried Hand of God rescues, plucking the ever-grateful Morten from his capsize.  Monitoring us all, ensuring that the RNLI didn’t run out of things to do, and taking the photos, was Charles Taylor.Over the course of the afternoon we trained with 15 of their crew (ie four boat crews), and they were grateful and appreciative, and were speaking of a continuing relationship, with another session envisaged for the spring.  What’s more, they’re setting up a similar session with another local club, Royal CC (we wouldn’t mind showing Royal how things should be done !!).

And what did the RNLI think of it all? Here is what their training co-ordinator said:

“I wanted to say, for myself and on behalf of all my crew who attended on Sunday 19, how truly fantastic you and your fellow paddlers were! We were all amazed and not a little humbled by the enthusiasm, expertise, hardiness (Morten may just win man of the match on that one), and sheer love of your sport that you all showed. My crew absolutely loved it and were still talking about the afternoon throughout our training on Tuesday – I think some are even keen on having a go themselves, inspired by you guys, and Hampton CC would be a natural port of first call for that after all we have seen.

“We have all learned some great lessons which will hopefully make us more effective, and the river a safer place for paddlers.
“As I said, should you wish us to lay on a station visit for families, particularly younger folk, we would be delighted to do so, and we are also very keen on a joint exercise in the spring.”
Andrew Wallace
You can see lots more pictures here